Australian consumers deserve better food labelling this Friday


Over 3,500 Australians join the call for traffic light labels

CHOICE says Federal Parliamentary Secretary for Health, Catherine King, should listen to the voices of Australian consumers and support better food labelling when Australia’s food and health ministers meet this Friday in Melbourne.

“Since last Wednesday, more than 3,500 consumers have joined CHOICE’s call on governments to introduce a traffic lights-style labelling system and help Australians make quick, easy decisions about the food we eat every day,” says CHOICE spokesperson Ingrid Just.[1]

CHOICE says that the Ministerial Council will have a once-in-a-generation opportunity to act on the demands of consumers when they respond to the recommendations of the independent, expert review of food labelling.

“Reviews like this come along very rarely, and every Minister who votes on Friday will shape food labelling for the next couple of decades, affecting millions of Australians in the decisions they make about the food they eat every day,” says Ms Just.

“That’s why we are calling on the Parliamentary Secretary to heed the expert panel’s advice, stand up for the future health of Australians and commit to better food labels.”

The people’s watchdog has put forward five priorities to fix dodgy food labels for the Ministerial Council meeting this Friday:[2] 

  1. Introducing a traffic light labelling system
  2.  to make healthy choices easier.
  3. Stamping out dodgy nutrition and health claims to reduce consumer confusion.
  4. Improving country-of-origin labelling to close loopholes and clear up uncertainties in the current regulations.
  5. Developing free-range labelling standards to ensure consumers willing to pay a premium for these products get what they pay for.
  6. Establishing a better framework for food labelling to ensure we don’t find ourselves another 13 years down the track confronting the same problems as today but with even worse health consequences. 

CHOICE is sending its open letter on traffic lights to the nine Federal, state and territory ministers who will decide the future of food labelling at Friday’s meeting. 

“We encourage Ms King to put the interests of consumers first, and we will ensure the spotlight is kept on governments as they decide the future of food labelling,” says Ms Just. 

Read more on CHOICE's position on traffic light labelling.

Media contact:

Ingrid Just, CHOICE, Head of Media and Spokesperson: 0430 172 669


 

[1] See CHOICE’s open letter at www.choice.com.au/foodlabellingletter

[2] For more information, see www.choice.com.au/betterfoodlabelling

Related articles

Related tags:
 
 

CHOICE guide to food labelling

You can't judge a book by its cover – what about food by its label?

20 Jan 2009 | Food labelling can be a minefield of confusion and misinformation. Labelling legislation offers some relief, but often isn't sufficiently enforced.

Traffic light labelling needs green light

New research shows traffic light labels help consumers make healthy choices.

19 Sep 2008 | A colour-coded traffic lights system, first developed by the UK Food Standards Agency, has been suggested as a more useful tool for helping consumers to make healthier food choices.

 

Australian consumers deserve better food labelling this Friday

9 Dec 2011 | CHOICE says Federal Parliamentary Secretary for Health, Catherine King, should listen to the voices of Australian consumers and support better food labelling when Australia’s food and health ministers meet this Friday in Melbourne.

Food Labelling Review - mostly healthy but missing a few key ingredients

28 Jan 2011 | CHOICE wants the government to accept and implement the recommondations without delay.

 

Industry food claims add to confusion

21 Sep 2011 | CHOICE is calling on food manufacturers to help fix up dodgy food labels following the launch of the CHOICE Better Food Labelling Campaign.

Traffic lights make healthy choices easier

29 Aug 2011 | CHOICE says that a survey released today by the Australian Food and Grocery Council [AFGC] tells only half the story on front-of-pack labels. The people’s watchdog is calling for the introduction of a traffic lights system, providing consumers with information at a glance.

 
 

Sign up to our free
e-Newsletter

Receive FREE email updates of our latest tests, consumer news and CHOICE marketing promotions.