Whole grains - healthy or hype?

There are five good reasons to include more wholegrains in your diet.
 
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  • Updated:7 Aug 2008
 

01 .Five good reasons

Whole grains

In brief

  • Wholegrains contain plant chemicals that can reduce your health risks. Eat at least two serves each day.
  • So-called supergrains are wholegrains, but not necessarily much more super than more common ones.
  • ‘Wholegrain’ on a label doesn’t always mean it’s all wholegrain.

Wholegrains are hot. They’re not just an ingredient, they’ve become a marketing tool food companies use to convince us to buy one product over another.

They’re also all the rage among doctors, dietitians and other health professionals, whose message is “eat more wholegrains” — and there are five good reasons why you should:

  • Heart health Large studies have found that eating plenty of wholegrains reduces the risk of heart disease and stroke.
    Reduce your cancer risk There’s evidence that eating wholegrains reduces the risk of some cancers, particularly of the digestive tract, but possibly breast and prostate cancer as well.
  • Reduce your risk of type 2 diabetes Wholegrains can improve blood sugar and insulin levels. Studies have shown a link between cereal fibre, which is highest in wholegrains, and a reduced chance of developing type 2 diabetes.
  • Better weight control There’s evidence that wholegrains can help people control their weight and (as long as they keep eating them) reduce the risk of gaining weight in later life.
  • Digestive health The insoluble fibre in wholegrains is essential to keep things moving in the bowel — which means less constipation and risk of diverticular disease.

CHOICE sifts through the marketing hype to give you the lowdown on wholegrains.

Please note: this information was current as of August 2008 but is still a useful guide today.


 
 

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Neil's opinion:

  • Member since: 23 May 14
  • 6 Comments
  • 3 Replies
 
User Profile

7 MONTHS AGO | I'm puzzled by the omission in this review of what is, for me, a very important part of my choice for an electric bike. And that is the weight. These electric bikes, or your own bike when converted, can weigh as much as 25kg. That's a lot of unwieldy bike to be carrying up or down more than a couple of steps. Far too much for someone who isn't very strong.

Take a look at the specs that the bike makers put on their websites. Again you will see that most makers 'accidentally' neglect to mention the weight of their bikes.

 

 
 

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Brian's opinion:

  • Member since: 09 Sep 13
  • 5 Comments
  • 1 Replies
 
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7 MONTHS AGO | I had a hub conversion kit fitted by Catavolt for $950, which included battery, throttle & pedal assist. The pedal assist is useful but problematic on low-speed tight corners. When you start to pedal, it takes off too energetically, and that could lead to an incident/accident. The article should comment on this for all models tested.

 

 
 

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Kampua's opinion:

  • Member since: 04 Nov 13
  • 37 Comments
  • 12 Replies
 
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8 MONTHS AGO | I read online (http://www.electricbike.com/mid-drive/) that mid drive provides more torque going uphill.

Aseako bike seems to be generating the most review (positive) at http://www.productreview.com.au/search.html?search=electric bike&sa=

Apparently Aseako bike used mid drive system that's why it provides more power uphill (http://www.aseakoelectricbike.com.au/central-drive-system/)

This article does not seems to address the difference between mid drive and hub motor. I would be interested in Torque vs Torque comparison of each bike.

Anyway I understand that this review was done by RideOn not Choice. Just my 2 cents.

 

 
 

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Serenity13's opinion:

  • Member since: 02 Oct 12
  • 1 Comments
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8 MONTHS AGO | I have now done over 4,500km on my Ezeebike sprint. I cannot tell you how much I love it. For city (Sydney) riding I would be lost without both pedal assist.

I test rode 4 different bikes and the ezee sprint was the one that I found was most comfortable and 'rode' like a normal bike. I now ride everywhere, even when I have access to a car. Next time, I will go straight for the biggest battery. I never get more than 27km from a single charge (and I tested and tried heaps of riding option and terrains) even though 25-40km is claimed.

 

 
 

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Wesley's opinion:

  • Member since: 10 Jun 12
  • 2 Comments
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8 MONTHS AGO | I have fitted a conversion kit from Applied Future Technologies of Melbourne, it performs well. I believe the centre mounted motor kit may be much cheaper and more efficient than the hub motor kits.
The distance traveled between recharges quoted by manufactures has little meaning as there are many variables , there is no standard test. In absence of testing a bike yourself go on the battery size. For comparison calculate the battery watt hour capacity which can be found multiplying together the amphour capacity by its voltage.

 

 
 

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Catheryn's opinion:

  • Member since: 03 Oct 08
  • 4 Comments
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11 MONTHS AGO | my advice is that anyone looking to buy an e bike needs to do a thorough riding test of the available models. I test rode a number of bikes recently and found that they were very different in handling, comfort, power and ease of use. By the way I found that the gazelle bike, recommended here while a nice looking bike and fairly comfortable to sit on was utterly useless in its assistance up any sort of incline, steep or otherwise. I ride a normal bike frequently and only am considering an electric bike to assist me uphills now that I am recovering from a minor knee injury. I consider the Gazelle not fit for its advertised purpose.

 

 
 

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Karen's opinion:

  • Member since: 16 Oct 10
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1 YEAR AGO | What about the promovec electric bike?

 

 
 

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Neil's opinion:

  • Member since: 23 May 14
  • 6 Comments
  • 3 Replies
 
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7 MONTHS AGO | I'm puzzled by the omission in this review of what is, for me, a very important part of my choice for an electric bike. And that is the weight. These electric bikes, or your own bike when converted, can weigh as much as 25kg. That's a lot of unwieldy bike to be carrying up or down more than a couple of steps. Far too much for someone who isn't very strong.

Take a look at the specs that the bike makers put on their websites. Again you will see that most makers 'accidentally' neglect to mention the weight of their bikes.

 

 
 

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Brian's opinion:

  • Member since: 09 Sep 13
  • 5 Comments
  • 1 Replies
 
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7 MONTHS AGO | I had a hub conversion kit fitted by Catavolt for $950, which included battery, throttle & pedal assist. The pedal assist is useful but problematic on low-speed tight corners. When you start to pedal, it takes off too energetically, and that could lead to an incident/accident. The article should comment on this for all models tested.

 

 
 

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Kampua's opinion:

  • Member since: 04 Nov 13
  • 37 Comments
  • 12 Replies
 
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8 MONTHS AGO | I read online (http://www.electricbike.com/mid-drive/) that mid drive provides more torque going uphill.

Aseako bike seems to be generating the most review (positive) at http://www.productreview.com.au/search.html?search=electric bike&sa=

Apparently Aseako bike used mid drive system that's why it provides more power uphill (http://www.aseakoelectricbike.com.au/central-drive-system/)

This article does not seems to address the difference between mid drive and hub motor. I would be interested in Torque vs Torque comparison of each bike.

Anyway I understand that this review was done by RideOn not Choice. Just my 2 cents.

 

 
 

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Serenity13's opinion:

  • Member since: 02 Oct 12
  • 1 Comments
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8 MONTHS AGO | I have now done over 4,500km on my Ezeebike sprint. I cannot tell you how much I love it. For city (Sydney) riding I would be lost without both pedal assist.

I test rode 4 different bikes and the ezee sprint was the one that I found was most comfortable and 'rode' like a normal bike. I now ride everywhere, even when I have access to a car. Next time, I will go straight for the biggest battery. I never get more than 27km from a single charge (and I tested and tried heaps of riding option and terrains) even though 25-40km is claimed.

 

 
 

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Wesley's opinion:

  • Member since: 10 Jun 12
  • 2 Comments
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8 MONTHS AGO | I have fitted a conversion kit from Applied Future Technologies of Melbourne, it performs well. I believe the centre mounted motor kit may be much cheaper and more efficient than the hub motor kits.
The distance traveled between recharges quoted by manufactures has little meaning as there are many variables , there is no standard test. In absence of testing a bike yourself go on the battery size. For comparison calculate the battery watt hour capacity which can be found multiplying together the amphour capacity by its voltage.

 

 
 

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Catheryn's opinion:

  • Member since: 03 Oct 08
  • 4 Comments
  • 7 Replies
 
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11 MONTHS AGO | my advice is that anyone looking to buy an e bike needs to do a thorough riding test of the available models. I test rode a number of bikes recently and found that they were very different in handling, comfort, power and ease of use. By the way I found that the gazelle bike, recommended here while a nice looking bike and fairly comfortable to sit on was utterly useless in its assistance up any sort of incline, steep or otherwise. I ride a normal bike frequently and only am considering an electric bike to assist me uphills now that I am recovering from a minor knee injury. I consider the Gazelle not fit for its advertised purpose.

 

 
 

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Karen's opinion:

  • Member since: 16 Oct 10
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1 YEAR AGO | What about the promovec electric bike?

 

 
 

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Neil's opinion:

  • Member since: 23 May 14
  • 6 Comments
  • 3 Replies
 
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7 MONTHS AGO | I'm puzzled by the omission in this review of what is, for me, a very important part of my choice for an electric bike. And that is the weight. These electric bikes, or your own bike when converted, can weigh as much as 25kg. That's a lot of unwieldy bike to be carrying up or down more than a couple of steps. Far too much for someone who isn't very strong.

Take a look at the specs that the bike makers put on their websites. Again you will see that most makers 'accidentally' neglect to mention the weight of their bikes.

 

 
 

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Brian's opinion:

  • Member since: 09 Sep 13
  • 5 Comments
  • 1 Replies
 
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7 MONTHS AGO | I had a hub conversion kit fitted by Catavolt for $950, which included battery, throttle & pedal assist. The pedal assist is useful but problematic on low-speed tight corners. When you start to pedal, it takes off too energetically, and that could lead to an incident/accident. The article should comment on this for all models tested.

 

 
 

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Kampua's opinion:

  • Member since: 04 Nov 13
  • 37 Comments
  • 12 Replies
 
User Profile

8 MONTHS AGO | I read online (http://www.electricbike.com/mid-drive/) that mid drive provides more torque going uphill.

Aseako bike seems to be generating the most review (positive) at http://www.productreview.com.au/search.html?search=electric bike&sa=

Apparently Aseako bike used mid drive system that's why it provides more power uphill (http://www.aseakoelectricbike.com.au/central-drive-system/)

This article does not seems to address the difference between mid drive and hub motor. I would be interested in Torque vs Torque comparison of each bike.

Anyway I understand that this review was done by RideOn not Choice. Just my 2 cents.

 

 
 

Reply to Kampua

 
 
 
 

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Serenity13's opinion:

  • Member since: 02 Oct 12
  • 1 Comments
  • 1 Replies
 
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8 MONTHS AGO | I have now done over 4,500km on my Ezeebike sprint. I cannot tell you how much I love it. For city (Sydney) riding I would be lost without both pedal assist.

I test rode 4 different bikes and the ezee sprint was the one that I found was most comfortable and 'rode' like a normal bike. I now ride everywhere, even when I have access to a car. Next time, I will go straight for the biggest battery. I never get more than 27km from a single charge (and I tested and tried heaps of riding option and terrains) even though 25-40km is claimed.

 

 
 

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Wesley's opinion:

  • Member since: 10 Jun 12
  • 2 Comments
  • 0 Replies
 
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8 MONTHS AGO | I have fitted a conversion kit from Applied Future Technologies of Melbourne, it performs well. I believe the centre mounted motor kit may be much cheaper and more efficient than the hub motor kits.
The distance traveled between recharges quoted by manufactures has little meaning as there are many variables , there is no standard test. In absence of testing a bike yourself go on the battery size. For comparison calculate the battery watt hour capacity which can be found multiplying together the amphour capacity by its voltage.

 

 
 

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Catheryn's opinion:

  • Member since: 03 Oct 08
  • 4 Comments
  • 7 Replies
 
User Profile

11 MONTHS AGO | my advice is that anyone looking to buy an e bike needs to do a thorough riding test of the available models. I test rode a number of bikes recently and found that they were very different in handling, comfort, power and ease of use. By the way I found that the gazelle bike, recommended here while a nice looking bike and fairly comfortable to sit on was utterly useless in its assistance up any sort of incline, steep or otherwise. I ride a normal bike frequently and only am considering an electric bike to assist me uphills now that I am recovering from a minor knee injury. I consider the Gazelle not fit for its advertised purpose.

 

 
 

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Karen's opinion:

  • Member since: 16 Oct 10
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1 YEAR AGO | What about the promovec electric bike?

 

 
 

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Neil's opinion:

  • Member since: 23 May 14
  • 6 Comments
  • 3 Replies
 
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7 MONTHS AGO | I'm puzzled by the omission in this review of what is, for me, a very important part of my choice for an electric bike. And that is the weight. These electric bikes, or your own bike when converted, can weigh as much as 25kg. That's a lot of unwieldy bike to be carrying up or down more than a couple of steps. Far too much for someone who isn't very strong.

Take a look at the specs that the bike makers put on their websites. Again you will see that most makers 'accidentally' neglect to mention the weight of their bikes.

 

 
 

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Brian's opinion:

  • Member since: 09 Sep 13
  • 5 Comments
  • 1 Replies
 
User Profile

7 MONTHS AGO | I had a hub conversion kit fitted by Catavolt for $950, which included battery, throttle & pedal assist. The pedal assist is useful but problematic on low-speed tight corners. When you start to pedal, it takes off too energetically, and that could lead to an incident/accident. The article should comment on this for all models tested.

 

 
 

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Kampua's opinion:

  • Member since: 04 Nov 13
  • 37 Comments
  • 12 Replies
 
User Profile

8 MONTHS AGO | I read online (http://www.electricbike.com/mid-drive/) that mid drive provides more torque going uphill.

Aseako bike seems to be generating the most review (positive) at http://www.productreview.com.au/search.html?search=electric bike&sa=

Apparently Aseako bike used mid drive system that's why it provides more power uphill (http://www.aseakoelectricbike.com.au/central-drive-system/)

This article does not seems to address the difference between mid drive and hub motor. I would be interested in Torque vs Torque comparison of each bike.

Anyway I understand that this review was done by RideOn not Choice. Just my 2 cents.

 

 
 

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Serenity13's opinion:

  • Member since: 02 Oct 12
  • 1 Comments
  • 1 Replies
 
User Profile

8 MONTHS AGO | I have now done over 4,500km on my Ezeebike sprint. I cannot tell you how much I love it. For city (Sydney) riding I would be lost without both pedal assist.

I test rode 4 different bikes and the ezee sprint was the one that I found was most comfortable and 'rode' like a normal bike. I now ride everywhere, even when I have access to a car. Next time, I will go straight for the biggest battery. I never get more than 27km from a single charge (and I tested and tried heaps of riding option and terrains) even though 25-40km is claimed.

 

 
 

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Wesley's opinion:

  • Member since: 10 Jun 12
  • 2 Comments
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8 MONTHS AGO | I have fitted a conversion kit from Applied Future Technologies of Melbourne, it performs well. I believe the centre mounted motor kit may be much cheaper and more efficient than the hub motor kits.
The distance traveled between recharges quoted by manufactures has little meaning as there are many variables , there is no standard test. In absence of testing a bike yourself go on the battery size. For comparison calculate the battery watt hour capacity which can be found multiplying together the amphour capacity by its voltage.

 

 
 

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Catheryn's opinion:

  • Member since: 03 Oct 08
  • 4 Comments
  • 7 Replies
 
User Profile

11 MONTHS AGO | my advice is that anyone looking to buy an e bike needs to do a thorough riding test of the available models. I test rode a number of bikes recently and found that they were very different in handling, comfort, power and ease of use. By the way I found that the gazelle bike, recommended here while a nice looking bike and fairly comfortable to sit on was utterly useless in its assistance up any sort of incline, steep or otherwise. I ride a normal bike frequently and only am considering an electric bike to assist me uphills now that I am recovering from a minor knee injury. I consider the Gazelle not fit for its advertised purpose.

 

 
 

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Karen's opinion:

  • Member since: 16 Oct 10
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1 YEAR AGO | What about the promovec electric bike?

 

 
 

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